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Monday, April 20, 2020 | History

4 edition of Initiation and frequency of debris flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona found in the catalog.

Initiation and frequency of debris flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona

Initiation and frequency of debris flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona

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  • 24 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Geological Survey, Branch of Information Services, distributor] in Tucson, Ariz, [Denver, CO .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Landslides -- Arizona -- Grand Canyon National Park,
  • Debris avalanches -- Arizona -- Grand Canyon National Park,
  • Shale -- Arizona -- Grand Canyon National Park

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Peter G. Griffiths, Robert H. Webb, and Theodore S. Melis ; prepared in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation
    SeriesU.S. Geological Survey open-file report -- 96-491
    ContributionsWebb, Robert H, Melis, Theodore S, Geological Survey (U.S.), United States. Bureau of Reclamation
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationiii, 35 p.
    Number of Pages35
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13632331M
    OCLC/WorldCa52785707

    • Oltrogge, Maureen. “Third Pipeline Break in Grand Canyon Closes Section of North Kaibab Trail.” GRCA Park Management Information 31 May, NPS Press Release. 25 July • Griffiths, Peter G., Robert H. Webb, and Theodore S. Melis. Initiation and frequency of debris flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona. No. USGS-OFR Debris Flows from Tributaries of the Colorado River, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona: Usgs Professional Paper Robert H Webb, Patrick T Pringle, Et Al: Books - or: Robert H Webb, Patrick T Pringle.


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Initiation and frequency of debris flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona Download PDF EPUB FB2

2 Initiation and Frequency of Debris Flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona INTRODUCTION Debris flows are the primary sediment transport process in tributaries of the Colorado River between Lees Ferry and Diamond Creek, Arizona (fig. This type of flash flood contains up to 80 percent sediment by weight and deposits poorly.

Initiation and Frequency of Debris Flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona: USGS Open-File Report [Griffiths, Peter G., Webb, Robert H., Melis, Melis S.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Initiation and Frequency of Debris Flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona: USGS. The occurrence of debris flows is greatest in eastern Grand Canyon, where 64% of the tributaries have had a probability of debris flow occurrence greater than 50% during the last century; debris flow frequency in western Grand Canyon is a similar 62%, whereas in Marble Canyon, only 47% of the tributaries have a probability greater than 50%.Cited by: Observations from through provide a 20 year record of all debris flows that reached the Initiation and frequency of debris flows in Grand Canyon River in Grand Canyon, and repeat photography provides a year record of debris flows from tributaries.

Observed frequencies are events/year from to in Grand Canyon, and repeat photography provides a year record of debris flows from tributaries.

Observed frequencies are events/year from toand. Observations from through provide a 20 year record of all debris flows that reached the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, and repeat photography provides a year record of debris flows from by: Initiation and frequency of debris flows in Grand Canyon from through provide a 20 year record of all debris flows that reached the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, and repeat photography provides a year record of debris flows from tributaries.

Observed frequencies are events/year from toand historic frequencies are events/year from to You have free access to this content Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface (–) VolumeIssue F4, Article first published online: 13 OCT Initiation and Frequency of Debris Flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona By Peter G.

Griffiths, Robert H. Webb, and Theodore S. Melis U.S. Arizona book Survey Open-File Report 96— Report availability: Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) or Portable Document Format (PDF). Debris flows occur in tributaries of the Colorado River Arizona book Grand Canyon, Arizona when intense precipitation causes slope failures in bedrock or colluvium.

Debris flows occur in tributaries of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona when intense precipitation causes slope failures in bedrock or colluvium. These slurries transport poorly sorted sediment, including very large boulders that form rapids at the mouths of tributaries and control the longitudinal profile of the Colorado River.

Griffiths, P.G., Webb, R.H., and Melis, T.S.,Initiation and frequency of debris flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report   Debris flows from tributaries transport sediment into the Colorado River in Initiation and frequency of debris flows in Grand Canyon Canyon, Arizona, creating rapids Initiation and frequency of debris flows in Grand Canyon control its longitudinal profile.

Debris flows mostly occur when runoff triggers failures in colluvium by Arizona book process termed "the fire hose effect." Debris flows originate from a limited number of geologic strata, almost exclusively shales or other clay-rich, fine-grained Cited by: Get this from a library.

Initiation and frequency of debris flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona. [Peter Arizona book Griffiths; Robert H Webb; Theodore S Melis; Geological Survey (U.S.); United States. Bureau of. - Buy Initiation and Frequency of Debris Flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona: Usgs Open-File Report book online at best prices in India on Read Initiation and Frequency of Debris Flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona: Usgs Open-File Report book reviews & author details and more at Free delivery on qualified : Peter G Griffiths.

The intensity of rainfall necessary to initiate debris flows in Grand Canyon is poorly known because few climatic stations are in debris-flow producing tributaries. Previous studies have reported rainfall that initiates debris flows to have intensities greater than 25 mm/hr with a total rainfall of at least 16 to 50 mm (Webb and others, ; Melis and others, ).

Free 2-day shipping. Buy Initiation and Frequency of Debris Flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona: Usgs Open-File Report at Discover our full range of books, gifts, toys, stationery and audiobooks at Buy online with Free UK Delivery on Orders Over £ Debris flows occur in tributaries of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon between Lees Ferry and Diamond Creek, Arizona (river miles 0 to ).

An episodic type of flash flood, debris flows transport poorly-sorted sediment ranging in size from clay to boulders into the Colorado River. Debris flows create and maintain debris fans and the hundreds of associated riffles and rapids that control. Table 1. Frequency of debris flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona Debris flows Tributaries in sample Percent of Tributaries per year Debris flows per year Sample Population No debris flows Total population Debris flows Sample Population a scale of a second set of unre- lated photographs, taken in November.

Buy Initiation and Frequency of Debris Flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona: USGS Open-File Report by Griffiths, Peter G., Webb, Robert H., Melis, Melis S.

(ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. Magnitude and frequency data for historic debris flows in Grand Canyon National Park and vicinity, Arizona [Unknown.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Magnitude and frequency data for historic debris flows in Grand Canyon National Park and vicinity, Arizona. Similar Items. Lava Falls Rapid in Grand Canyon: effects of late Holocene debris flows on the Colorado River / by: Webb, Robert H., Published: () Dating prehistoric tributary debris fans, Colorado River, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona with implications for channel evolution and river navigability / by: Hereford, Richard, et al.

Published: (). Add to Book Bag Remove from Book Bag. Saved in: Frequency of debris flows in Grand Canyon. Bibliographic Details; Main Author: Webb, Robert H. Corporate Authors: Geological Survey (U.S.), Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center.

Other Authors: z Arizona |z Grand Canyon. Initiation and Frequency of Debris Flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona: Usgs Open-File Report Peter G Griffiths, Robert H Webb, Melis S Melis: Books - or: Peter G Griffiths, Robert H Webb, Melis S Melis.

INITIATION In the Grand Canyon, there are three principle mechanisms for initiation; bedrock failure, the fire hose effect, and colluvium failure.

Direct bedrock failure usually results in the largest debris flows that reach the mainstem. In the upper portions of Arizona temperatures frequently drop in to the freezing range throughout the winter. Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS) Keywords P.G., Webb, R.H., and Melis, T.S.

() Initiation and Frequency of Debris Flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona (USGS Open-file report ). US Geological Survey, Reston, VA. Griffith, P.G., and Wise, T.J.

() Magnitude and Frequency Data for Historic Debris Flows in Grand Cited by: Buy Initiation and frequency of debris flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona (U.S. Geological Survey open-file report) by Peter G Griffiths (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Peter G Griffiths. Particular interests included the frequency, processes of initiation, and geomorphic impact of debris flows, especially in the canyons of the Colorado River system, and sediment yield and transport in small drainage basins in arid environments.

R.H., and Melis, T.S.,Initiation and frequency of debris flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona. ↑ Initiation and Frequency of Debris Flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona U.S.

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Open-File Report 96— ↑ Grand Canyon Rock Layers, at Grand Canyon Explorer, by Bob Ribokas ↑ The Biological Isolation of Shiva Temple, by John R. Meyer and George F.

Howe, Creation Research Society Quarterly Journal, Vol Number 4, March. Debris flows from tributaries of the Colorado River, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona: USGS Professional Paper : Robert H. Webb, Patrick Format: Tapa blanda. This second edition of the leading book on Grand Canyon geology contains the most recent discoveries and interpretations of the origin and history of the canyon.

It includes two entirely new chapters: one on debris flow in the Canyon and one on Holocene deposits in the canyon. • Debris flows are slurries of poorly sorted sediment and water • Particles range from clay to boulders feet in b-axis diameter • Typical moisture contents reconstituted from Grand Canyon debris flows range from % (n=49) • Three types of flood hydrographs with a debris-flow component occur in Grand Canyon.

Initiation and frequency of debris flows in Grand Canyon: GSA Abstracts with Programs: no 6: Abstract: Colorado River, debris flows, Grand Canyon, hazards, rainfall, stability, storms: GeoRef Disc 4: Griffiths, P.G.

et al. Magnitude and flow transformation of debris flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona: GSA Abstracts with Programs. Get this from a library. Magnitude and frequency data for historic debris flows in Grand Canyon National Park and vicinity, Arizona.

[Theodore S Melis; United States. Bureau of Reclamation.; Geological Survey (U.S.);]. @article{osti_, title = {Debris flows from tributaries of the Colorado River, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona}, author = {Webb, R.H. and Pringle, P.T. and Rink, G.R.}, abstractNote = {A reconnaissance of 36 tributaries of the Colorado River indicates that debris flows are a major process by which sediment is transported to the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park.

The Prospect Valley drainage basin consists of km 2 of forest, grassland, and desert scrub south of Grand Canyon and is the ninth largest of tributaries that produce debris flows in Grand Canyon (Melis et al., ).Most of the upper part of the drainage basin lies between and m.

Prospect Valley drains northward and abruptly changes into a small gorge informally called Cited by:   Debris-flow processes in the eastern Uinta Mountains are similar to those in Grand Canyon, where the firehose effect is also the dominant debris flow initiation mechanism (Griffiths et al., ).

Dinosaur National Monument has strong bedrock that forms cliffs and weak shales that form slopes where colluvium is stored, similar to Grand by: IJEGE_BS-Loye-et-alii. transport of sediment and initiation of debris flows. The middle and down part of the watershed, although quite R.H.

() - Frequency and initiation of debris flows in Grand Canyon, Arizona. Geophys. Res.,F H. aCk. Geomorphology 27 93– Cosmogenic 3He ages and frequency of late Holocene debris flows from Prospect Canyon, Grand Canyon, USA Thure E.

Cerling a,), Robert H. Webb b, Robert J. Poreda c, Alan D. Rigby a, Theodore S. Melis d a Department of Geology and Geophysics, Uni˝ersity of Utah, Salt Lake City, UTUSA b US Geological Sur˝ey, W. Anklam Road, Tucson, AZUSA. A reconnaissance of 36 tributaries of the Colorado River indicates pdf debris pdf are a major process by which sediment is transported to the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park.

Debris flows are slurries of sediment and water that have a water content of less than about 40 percent by volume. Debris flows occur frequently in arid and semiarid regions. Slope failures commonly.Glen Canyon Dam has altered flow and fine sediment (sand, silt, and clay) dynamics of the Colorado River download pdf Grand Canyon.

Before the dam, the Colorado River experienced highly variable flows and carried a large amount of sediment through Grand Canyon, which maintained sandbars (highly valued camping areas in Grand Canyon) and provided sand that protected archeological and cultural sites .Debris Flows and Ebook in Southeastern Arizona from Extreme Precipitation in July Magnitude, Frequency, and Sediment Delivery: USGS Open-File Report by Robert H.

Webb ISBN ().